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Manitoba Truckers Needed: How to Get Funding for Truck Driver Training

- by Christina Hryniuk

Manitoba’s most recent labour market information report (Labour Market Occupational Forecasts 2019-2025) shows transport truck driver is an occupation with one of the highest levels of net openings. In fact, 99 percent of the 500 specifically listed occupations in the report have lower new job numbers than transport truck driver.


Manitoba needs 4,100 Transport Truck Drivers by 2025 if the needs of the provincial economy are going to be met. While this information highlights a serious economic concern, it also presents significant job fulfillment and public policy opportunity. Specifically, in support of the Manitoba Skills Strategy and Manitoba Works plans which have targeted “enhanced alignment between workforce training …and labour market needs” as well as “40,000 private sector jobs”. According to a national labour market forecast, vacancies for truck drivers across the country have more than doubled since 2016 with 22,000 vacant positions in 2018.



So what options are available for carriers to fill these positions? There is the driver training funding program, which covers the cost of driver training for those eligible applicants. Hundreds of Manitobans have been trained via this program already. The Manitoba Trucking Association (MTA) encourages trucking companies looking for drivers to take part in the program.
So how does it work?


Funding for Truck Driver Training

People who are looking to become drivers first need to obtain their class 5 driver’s license and finish the graduated licensee process. At this point, air brakes certification may be required.


Once you complete the graduate process, you will need your class medical, which has to be completed by a doctor and can be obtained through the registry of motor vehicles or Manitoba Public Insurance (MPI) or your local insurance broker. Your medical conditions will be reviewed by a board of approval of Class 1 upgrade.



After you receive your medical, obtain the Class 1 instruction, book your test with MPI, and write your class 1 knowledge test.



You will then have to obtain your commercial abstract from MPI or your insurance broker. A commercial driver’s abstract reflects your driving habits for all class vehicles. The next step is to get a criminal record check. A clean search report is best because it allows you to cross the border, but its not necessary.



There are six approved truck driver training schools in the province. Upon registration the school will provide you with a letter acknowledging your registration.


You will also need to obtain a letter of intent from a trucking company. A letter is an acknowledgment-not an offer-that you spoke with them about the trucking industry. It indicates that the employer will hire you upon completing school and a company road test, based on the information you provided them. The letter of intent and registration letter will now allow you to approach your local Manitoba Jobs and Skills Development Centre for approval of funding.


Funding is available for the 240-hour Class 1 Training Program and is open to Canadian citizens and permanent residents.




For Employers

There are also opportunities to promote your organization by other means, such as Yes! Winnipeg’s 2020 International Recruitment Mission. The Asper School of Business regularly looks for companies to work with on co-op placements, as does Red River College. While these are not all opportunities for driving positions, the reality is that we need talented people throughout our industry.


Finally, there are resources available to smaller trucking companies, such as the Canada Small Business Financing Program, that will support investment in your organization (not specifically people) that may help your business grow as needed.


It can sometimes be a challenge to know where to turn to support your business, but the first place to try is the MTA. We regularly receive new information about new programs and opportunities, and we are always working to improve efficiency in bringing new people to our industry. So, if you have a question or aren’t sure where to turn for resources, contact us.


 

We can learn from U.S. ELDT program

- by Christina Hryniuk

Once again, our American counterparts appear on pace to beat us to the punch when it comes to implementing a much-needed safety initiative.

This time, it is the FMCSA’s national Entry Level Driver Training (ELDT), which is supposed to come into effect in February 2020. Watching this program roll out, I would suggest that there is a lot that we can learn from this process.

This will be a national backstop program, meaning that across the country, there is now a minimum training standard.

Once this program is implemented, no one will be able to simply test for a commercial vehicle license, they will be required to take some form of entry level training.

This is something that the Manitoba Trucking Association’s (MTA) board of directors has discussed with a national training program: the need to ensure there aren’t any loopholes or opportunities to slip through the cracks.

By having one national program, a backstop, if you will, no drivers can take advantage of lower standards in one state or another. Further, if a state already has a testing standard in place that is higher than what the FMCSA is proposing, the higher standard remains in effect.

With that said, it has to be pointed out that saying “there’s a standard” has to actually mean something.

In Manitoba, drivers in the MELT program are required to complete 121.5 hours of training, consisting of 40 hours in-class, followed by 41 hours in-cab, as well as 40.5 hours in the yard. Instructors are able to access a government and industry-designed set of training materials designed to cover all of the content in the curriculum.

According to the FMCSA website, there is no required amount of classroom theory/knowledge training or set number of hours behind the wheel. In this program, a new driver’s ability to drive is at the discretion of the trainer.

No specific training materials have been developed by the FMCSA beyond what can be found in the appendices of 49 CFR 380. This is a government document, not training material. So, to say there’s a testing standard might not mean what we would anticipate.

Second, much of the program requires self-certification that is not overseen. While we want to trust that everyone who registers with the Training Provider Registry meets the requirements, based on what our industry has seen with self-certification of ELDs in the U.S., the question must be asked, “Have all of the requirements actually been met?”

Finally, this is a huge program, which has led to delays in implementation and the usual finger pointing. Getting all regions on board and developing the necessary infrastructure and automation is a huge undertaking.

This isn’t a surprise, nor is this unique to the FMCSA. The recently implemented carbon tax backstop program here is Canada also had huge infrastructure and wrinkles that are still being resolved. Unfortunately, what it means right now is that the ELDT program is in limbo.

Why is it important for Canada’s trucking industry to pay attention to this? First, these drivers will be driving in Canada, so we want to ensure their drivers are as safe and well-trained as ours (safety-related reciprocity is a longstanding issue in Manitoba between the MTA and Manitoba Infrastructure).

However, there is opportunity to learn from their program as well.

If we can learn from its deficiencies, such as by ensuring the infrastructure is in place well in advance of roll-out or by developing a higher standard that is accepted across the board, then I believe we will be working toward creating a more level, safer playing field for all carriers and new drivers.

Our executive director Terry Shaw wrote this feature for trucknews.com.



 

MTA's Executive Director Terry Shaw on CJOB talking about Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel

- by Christina Hryniuk

Terry Shaw, Executive Director of the Manitoba Trucking Association (MTA), speaks about the differences of biodiseal and renewable diesel in light of the province's announcement about increasing Manitoba's biodiesel content and what it means for the trucking industry. Shaw also dives in to other options for reducing green house gases.

The MTA has been advocating for the GrEEner Trucking Program for years. We will continue to advocate for other options such as electrification and policy programs that are industry standard.

Listen to the interview here.


 

MTA Unsurprised by OAG Findings on Commercial Vehicle Safety Oversight

- by Aaron Dolyniuk

Wednesday, December 18, 2019 - Winnipeg, MB- The Manitoba Trucking Association is appreciative of the work done by Manitoba’s Office of the Auditor General but unsurprised by findings in a report released today.

“We know that this report will help the general public better understand the opportunities for improving commercial vehicle safety in Manitoba. However, nothing in this report is news to us or Manitoba Infrastructure. The MTA has been requesting change on behalf of our industry for a long time - years, even decades,” explain Terry Shaw, Executive Director of the Manitoba Trucking Association. “This report supports what we have been advocating for on behalf of our members. It will better inform the public about safety oversight of our industry, and that the will of an informed public will guide this government’s decision-making.”

The report, “Department of Infrastructure: Oversight of Commercial Vehicle Safety”, covered the time period from April 2017 to August 2018, and examined the adequacy of the Department of Infrastructure’s oversight of commercial vehicle safety, including the motor-carrier safety fitness program, on-road commercial vehicle inspections, and strategic planning and performance management. The conclusion of the Office of the Auditor General is that oversight of commercial vehicle safety is inadequate in Manitoba, with gaps in management of on-road inspections, weak planning and performance measurement processes, and that safety-fitness programs practices are insufficient to verify and promote road safety.

“When you read through this report, you will see that the department agrees with every single recommendation provided by the Office of the Auditor General. Some of these have been on our list since the early 2000s. What we question is why and how any of these items are still up for discussion? They should have been resolved years ago to improve road safety in Manitoba,” adds John Erik Albrechtsen, President of the MTA.

Some specific recommendations from the report include:

  • better assessment and promotion of new entrants’ safety fitness,
  • strengthening checks for chameleon carriers,
  • improved methodology to grade and assess operators’ safety performance,
  • flag for follow-up those operators within the total population who pose the greatest safety risk to the public and are most in need of improvement,
  • help poor-performing operators identify underlying safety-management weaknesses and take appropriate corrective action,
  • determine and document the likely underlying causes and corrective actions needed to address any identified non-compliance with safety regulations,
  • require all operators flagged as poor performers to include reports on their progress in implementing action-plans for improvement when renewing their certificates,
  • ensure that all methods used to award operators “satisfactory” safety-fitness ratings are transparent, can be logically defended, and treat all operators with similar safety-records consistently,
  • seek greater clarity on its current practice of not requiring any U.S.-based carriers operating in Manitoba to be registered in Manitoba’s safety-fitness program,
  • stop registering commercial operators of heavy-farm-trucks in the safety-fitness program without requiring them to obtain safety-fitness certificates,
  • improve the percentage of commercial truck traffic subject to inspection,
  • adopt greater variability in its weigh station and patrol operating hours in order to make them less predictable,
  • build on its past success in increasing the number of inspections being performed,
  • develop a documented performance management process for its on-road enforcement officers,
  • develop and implement a formal plan for commercial vehicle safety.

“Regulations are only as good as the oversight associated with them. Opportunities for improvement have been confirmed by Manitoba’s Auditor General so what our industry members want to know is when Manitoba Infrastructure actually plans to implement the recommendations agreed to in this report?” concludes Shaw.

The Manitoba Trucking Association is very appreciative of the work done by Manitoba’s Office of the Auditor General to highlight the current state of commercial vehicle oversight provincially, and looks forward to working with Manitoba Infrastructure on the implementation of these recommendations.

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For more information, please contact:

Terry Shaw

Executive Director

Manitoba Trucking Association

204-632-6600

tshaw@trucking.mb.ca


 

Trucking HR Canada Awards 2019 Top Fleet Employers at Annual Gala

- by Aaron Dolyniuk

OTTAWA, ON (October 17, 2019) – Trucking HR Canada held its annual Top Fleet Employers Awards Gala Dinner on Thursday October 17th. The event brought together over 380 industry professionals to shine the spotlight on some of the best workplaces in Canada’s trucking and logistics industry.

All sixty-three fleets were celebrated for their commitment to sound HR policies that meet Trucking HR Canada’s Standards of Excellence. Awards were given to celebrate the most impressive workplaces across the country, taking into consideration online applications and employee surveys which look at a variety of HR best practices.

The Top Private Fleet Award went to Trailer Wizards. ONE For Freight was the recipient of the Top Small Fleet Award. The Top Medium Fleet Award went to Q-Line Trucking and rounding out the fleet awards, was Bison Transport who took home the Top Large Fleet Award.

The Achievement of Excellence Awards are broken down into seven categories to highlight leaders in specific HR areas. The recipient of the Workplace Culture Award was Challenger Motor Freight. Sutco Transportation Specialists took home the Award for Workplace Diversity. The recipient of HR Innovation Award was Westcan Bulk Transport. The Employee Engagement Award went to STG Fleet Services, and taking home the Award for Training and Skills Development was Arrow Transportation Systems Inc. This year we introduced two new awards, the Achievement of Excellence for Workplace Mental Health, awarded to Joseph Haulage Canada Corp., and the Achievement of Excellence for Women in the Workplace, awarded to XTL Transport Inc.

The night’s most coveted award – the HR Leader of the Year Award, presented by Reimer Associates – was saved for last and was awarded to Denise McJannet of Caron Transportation Systems.

“We are honoured to recognize employers who work year-round to provide great workplaces for all their employees," said Angela Splinter, CEO, Trucking HR Canada. “And, with fleets under pressure to attract and recruit workers, being a Top Fleet Employer certainly helps these fleets stand-out from the crowd”

The successful event was made possible by Trucking HR Canada’s partners and sponsors which include Reimer Associates, The Canadian Trucking Alliance, TransCore Link Logistics, Revolutions Staffing, The Guarantee, Veza, Bell, Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association, Monster, Northbridge, Driver Engagement, Isaac Instruments and exclusive media sponsor Newcom Media.

Applications for the Top Fleet Employers Program open in just a few days, on October 21st, and is open to any Canadian fleet. The program has grown significantly over the past six years, in turn raising the bar of the HR standards in the industry overall.

If you think your fleet has what it takes to be a Top Fleet Employer, Trucking HR Canada encourages you to apply and join other fleets that shine a positive light on the trucking industry, and help showcase this industry as a great place to work.

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Trucking HR Canada is a national partnership-based organization that is dedicated to developing, sharing and promoting the trucking industry’s best practices in human resources and training.

For further information, contact:
Bridget O’Shaughnessy
Manager, Marketing and Communications
info@truckingHR.com
613-244-4800 x 302


 

WINTER: SAFETY TIPS FOR TRUCK DRIVERS

- by Don Stewart



Prepare For The Winter Season:

Driving a tractor trailer in serious Canadian winter conditions, demands a specific set of skills for all drivers, especially big rig drivers. Too many drivers on the highways do not alter their driving habits, when driving in poor weather conditions. Good maneuvering and skid control skills are essential in poor weather.

Knowledge and implementation of proper, preventative safety skills for driving in poor conditions, can truly separate the seasoned driver vs a driver who is just starting their career. They have the knowledge and experience for making good decisions and are cognizant when conditions are not safe, and when it’s time to ‘get off the road’.

Driving in bad weather, especially in snow and on ice, is risky due to more ‘stop time’ required, poor visibility, poor traction and the increased unpredictability of other drivers on the road. The job of a truck driver becomes increasingly challenging, especially when handling a tractor trailer and a full load in foul winter weather.

Safe Winter Truck Driving Safety Tips

Slow down – Accidents during suspect conditions are mostly due to excessive speed. Driving at the speed limit may be legal, but is often too fast for snow covered or icy road conditions in our Country. Take as much time as necessary. DO NOT HURRY! Speed is dangerous. This rule should ALWAYS be at the top of any winter trucking safety tips list.

Keep a safe following distance – Leave plenty of room between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of your truck, and beside your truck, when possible (approx. 1/4 mile).

Don’t travel as part of a pack – Traffic seems to move in ‘packs’ on the highway. Find a safe way to get away from the pack and travel alone, with the goal being to maximize the distance around your vehicle.

Don’t follow the tail lights of the vehicle ahead – When the snow is so heavy, visibility is low, seeing the tail lights of the vehicle ahead…means following too closely.

Keep a safe driving distance back at all times, especially in bad weather. If the leader makes an error, you will too. Trucks can leave the road, and yours could follow the lead truck off the road.

Use good, solid judgment — If the weather is so severe that you need to get off the road….. do it. Find a place to get off the road safely and wait until conditions are safer for travel.

Don’t stop on the shoulder of the road –– Especially in low visibility situations, when driving in winter, especially ‘blinding snow’, other vehicles can mistake your position for being on the road and as a result, may slam into the back of your rig.

Don’t try to be a hero –– When the road conditions are severe, you need to recognize that it’s very dangerous to be out there. Hours of service rules, dispatchers etc., are sometimes extra pressures. Don’t feel that you’re letting anyone down by not meeting a scheduled appointment.

Braking – Some drivers like to use the jake brakes in less than perfect weather conditions. Some don’t. DO NOT ENGAGE THE JAKE BRAKE ON ICY ROADS. Try to avoid overusing your foot brake, unless the entire unit is absolutely ‘straight’ on the road. Don’t over brake when the entire unit isn’t straight… the trailer can slide and spin you out of your position…..the truck slows down, and the trailer does not. This is especially true, when the trailer is empty.

Tire Chains- With the rising cost fines in our mountainous regions, ensuring your tire chains are in working order and utilizing them during mandatory periods, is paramount in the safety of your truck.

Ensure ‘all systems’ are a go — Be absolutely certain during your circle checks before you leave, that the defroster and heater are working properly. Wipers, wiper motor, lights, esp. brake and tail lights, washer fluid is topped up, drain moisture from the air tanks, all brakes are set up and windows and mirrors are completely clean before departure.

Keep fuel tanks topped up, for extra weight over the drive tires, to aid with traction. Good quality lug tires, with the proper tire pressure, are essential for good traction for the best safe winter driving.

Keep tractor and trailer lights clean — When you’re able to stop in a safe place, clear the lights off of snow and ice, which builds up in foul weather….they are vital, more than ever when visibility is poor. LED lights especially accumulate snow and crud. Keep everything clean, so you can BE SEEN!

If you have any safety tips to share or would like to hear more about Winter Driving.

Please contact: 204 632-6600

 

Back To School

- by Don Stewart

With The Return To School Around The Corner, Please Slow Down!

School days bring congestion: Yellow school buses are picking up their students, kids on bikes are hurrying to get to school before the bell rings, and harried parents are trying to drop their kids off before work.

It's never more important for drivers to slow down and pay attention than when kids are present especially before and after school.

If You're Dropping Off

Schools often have very specific drop-off procedures for the school year. Make sure you know them for the safety of all kids. More children are hit by cars near schools than at any other location, according to the National Safe Routes to School program. The following apply to all school zones:

·Don't double park; it blocks visibility for other children and vehicles

·Don't load or unload children across the street from the school

·Carpool to reduce the number of vehicles at the school

Sharing the Road with Young Pedestrians

According to research by the National Safety Council, most of the children who lose their lives in bus-related incidents are 4 to 7 years old, and they're walking. They are hit by the bus, or by a motorist illegally passing a stopped bus... A few precautions go a long way toward keeping children safe:

·Don't block the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or waiting to make a turn, forcing pedestrians to go around you; this could put them in the path of moving traffic

·In a school zone when flashers are blinking, stop and yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk or intersection

·Always stop for a school patrol officer or crossing guard holding up a stop sign

·Take extra care to look out for children in school zones, near playgrounds and parks, and in all residential areas

·Don't honk or rev your engine to scare a pedestrian, even if you have the right of way

·Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians

·Always use extreme caution to avoid striking pedestrians wherever they may be, no matter who has the right of way

Sharing the Road with School Buses

If you're driving behind a bus, allow a greater following distance than if you were driving behind a car. It will give you more time to stop once the yellow lights start flashing. It is illegal in all 50 states to pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children.

·Never pass a bus from behind or from either direction if you're on an undivided road if it is stopped to load or unload children

·If the yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop

·The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children; stop far enough back to allow them space to safely enter and exit the bus

·Be alert; children often are unpredictable, and they tend to ignore hazards and take risks

Sharing the Road with Bicyclists

On most roads, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as vehicles, but bikes can be hard to see. Children riding bikes create special problems for drivers because usually they are not able to properly determine traffic conditions. The most common cause of collision is a driver turning left in front of a bicyclist.

  • When passing a bicyclist, proceed in the same direction slowly, and leave 3 feet between your car and the cyclist
  • When turning left and a bicyclist is approaching in the opposite direction, wait for the rider to pass
  • If you're turning right and a bicyclists is approaching from behind on the right, let the rider go through the intersection first, and always use your turn signals
  • Watch for bike riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling; children especially have a tendency to do this
  • Be extra vigilant in school zones and residential neighborhoods
  • Watch for bikes coming from driveways or behind parked cars
  • Check side mirrors before opening your door

By exercising a little extra care and caution, drivers and pedestrians can co-exist safely in school zones. Please Slow Down!

204 632-6600


 

Coalition of Business Organizations Urging Political Parties to Focus on Economy in Provincial Election

- by Aaron Dolyniuk

Winnipeg, MB, August 19, 2019 - A coalition of 10 organizations that represents the interest of thousands of businesses in the Province of Manitoba are calling on all political parties in Provincial Election 2019 to focus their efforts on Growing the Manitoba Economy.

The coalition’s members believe that economic growth should be the top priority, and that the overriding challenge for the next five years will be diversifying our agricultural, manufacturing, resource, financial and service sectors to strengthen the capacity for export and create jobs. Prudent investments within a climate of confidence and certainty enable growth, leading to more jobs, greater prosperity, and a higher quality of life.

Each of the main political parties in Election 2019 will be invited to review and respond to the coalition’s platform, and to outline their party’s commitments and policies in response to each of our seven key principles:

  1. A Common Economic Agenda
  2. Infrastructure Investment
  3. Global Trade
  4. Indigenous Engagement
  5. Producing, Attracting and Retaining Talent
  6. Access to Capital
  7. Establish Strong Sustainable Fiscal Relationships

Those responses will be made public in advance of the September 10th election date.

The Coalition is comprised of the following members:

Business Council of Manitoba Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters

Manitoba Chambers of Commerce Manitoba Heavy Construction Association

Manitoba Home Builders’ Association Manitoba Real Estate Association

Manitoba Trucking Association Merit Contractors Association of Manitoba

Winnipeg Construction Association The Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce

Please see attached document

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For additional information, please contact:

Chuck Davidson

President & CEO

The Manitoba Chambers of Commerce

227 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg MB

d. 204-948-0107

c. 204-782-1679

e. cdavidson@mbchamber.mb.ca

Growing Manitoba Economy - Final.pdf


 

National Truck Week 2019

- by Don Stewart

National Truck Week is traditionally a week-long celebration during the first week of September and the purpose of the week-long celebration, is to recognize the important contributions made by the 400,000 Canadian women and men who keep the country's freight moving.

Provincial trucking associations, carriers, industry suppliers and other stakeholders are encouraged to undertake activities in their own province to mark the event. In previous years, provincial associations have marked the occasion with newspaper supplements, radio advertising, contests, special promotions, and special events at truck stops and roadside inspection stations.
Carriers and industry suppliers have hosted BBQs, breakfasts, truck washes, offered special giveaways to employees and marked the week event with a wide variety of activities.

The Manitoba Trucking Association participates in the community as much as we can on a year-round basis. National Trucking Week provides us with an opportunity to bring the community together with our industry. We can help worthy causes and help educate the public about our industry at the same time.

MTA Day At The Park: August 28th @ 1900-2130

Although this is not technically during National Truck Week, we are considering this event as our kickoff to NTW again this year. Our Members American Express are hosting over 150 of our Industry members at the Goldeyes game against the Gary SouthShore RailCats. This will be a fun event as the Goldeye's are also members of the Association and we look forward to the camaraderie this will share at the ball park.

Member Visits: September 3rd

The MTA will be out and about visiting members, while delivering some gifts and good cheer! Time to get pumped up for the week long celebration! Whoot Whoot!!

Vehicle Maintenance Golf Tournament: September 4th @ 11:00

This years tournament will be hosted by Bridges Golf Course in Starbuck MB. It’s a four-person Texas Scramble best ball tournament that includes 18 holes (with power cart), lunch, dinner and registration gift. Proceeds will go to the MTA scholarship program, which presents MTA members or members children with over $10,000 annually for scholarships.

Headingley/Emmerson Scale BBQ in partnership with HyLife Foods, Bison Transport and Inland/CTS: September 5th @ 10:00-1500

This long time running event, has been a very rewarding day for all involved. There will be volunteers from Traction and the MTA handing out BBQ food & loot bags for all the drivers, whom pass through the scales. This is a great opportunity to thank the drivers for all they do for us Manitobans. The drivers always look forward to seeing us at the scales!

The MTA Truck Pull for United Way: Friday September 6th @ 1700-2000

What a better way to wrap up National Trucking Week then demonstrating the MB Trucking Industry’s commitment to giving back and creating a better Winnipeg. Join us in making the impossible, possible. By pulling together, we can help kids, families and seniors in our community.

At the 9th Annual MTA Truck Pull for United Way, each team will test its strength by pulling a big rig across the finish line. We are hosting the event this year in front of the MTA office at 25 Bunting Street.This family friendly event will bring together food, fun and friends from across MB’s trucking industry, in healthy competition for a good cause: a better Winnipeg.

There will be a kids zone this year that will feature a 28 foot Fire Engine slide and face painters. Join Mick E Moose, Buzz, Boomer and their friends to pull a truck or to cheer on those that are!

Truck Convoy For Special Olympics: New Date September 14th 11:00-1400

Join Manitoba's compassionate army of truck drivers at the World's Largest Truck Convoy for Special Olympics! It is a one day event where industry and law enforcement come together in a convoy that tours the perimeter highway starting at 11:00 am. After the convoy there will be a lunch, Silent Auction and Awards.

Starting at the - Trans Canada Centre (1 Rivard St, Ile Des Chenes)

Whether you're in the convoy or lining the side of the perimeter to watch, with approximately 200 trucks our convoy is 6 miles long and it's quite a sight to see!

 

Professional Truck Driving Championships

- by Don Stewart

Provincial Truck Driving Championship Winners Announced

The Professional Truck Driving Championship is a competition for professional truck drivers to showcase their incredible driving skills. They must drive through a prescribed obstacle course, perform a timed pre trip inspection and complete a written test. The winners in each category will become the MB Champion in their class and will receive a trophy and prize.

The 2019 Manitoba Professional Truck Driving Championships are officially in the books! This event was Held on June 15, at the Headingley Husky.

First Place Winners:

  • Single/Tandem: Bruce McKechnie of Bison Transport Inc.
  • Tandem/Tandem: Brian Hrabarchuk of Canadian Freightways Ltd.
  • Super B: David Henry of REK Express
  • Turn Pike: Roy Dillon of TransX Group of Companies

Second Place:

  • Single/Tandem: Mario Tyszuk of Bison Transport
  • Tandem/Tandem: Sergii Linkevych of Bison Transport (Saskatchewan Competitor)
  • Super B: David Greschuk of Arnold Bros. Transportation Academy
  • Turn Pike: David Phillips of Bison Transport

Third Place:

  • Single/Tandem: Jason Novak of Canadian Freightways
  • Tandem/Tandem: Jasvinder Brar of Bison Transport
  • Super B: Rodney Birdsbill of Bison Transport
  • Turn Pike: Darren Cassan of Arnold Bros. Transport

Teams:

  • 1st Place Team: Bison #1
  • 2nd Place Team: Bison # 2
  • 3rd Place Team: Arnold Bros. Transport

Other Competition Winners:

  • First Time Entrant: Darren Cassan of Arnold Bros. Transport Ltd.
  • Hal Bjornson Memorial Award: Brian Hrabarchuk of Canadian Freightways Ltd.
  • Grand Champion: Brian Hrabarchuk of Canadian Freightways Ltd.
  • Partner Competition: Cayla McKechnie (Bison Transport Inc)
Please watch the MTA's June newsletter for a complete listing of winners and pictures.


204 632-6600


 

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