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Tagged: Manitoba

How to Become a Successful Trucking Dispatcher

- by Christina Hryniuk

Truck drivers represent more than 45 percent of our industry’s workers, but there are other occupations in trucking and logistics that deserve consideration too.

According to Trucking HR’s Labour Market Information: Interim Report September 2019, dispatchers made up about two percent of the workforce. Despite such a low number, they play a substantial and important role in the trucking industry.

From Statistics Canada’s 2016 Census we know:

  • There are 16,730 dispatchers working in Canada’s trucking and logistics industry
  • Regionally, 12% of these dispatchers are in B.C., 15% in Alberta, 7% in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 39% in Ontario, 22% in Quebec and 5% in Atlantic Canada
  • Women make up 39% of the dispatcher workforce
  • 19% of dispatchers are newcomers to Canada
  • 19% are visible minorities
  • 4% of dispatchers are Indigenous

People between the ages of 15 and 35 make up 31 percent of the position, while people over the age of 55 account for 17 percent.


Become a dispatcher

A dispatcher monitors where trucks are located, checks on how the runs are going, deals with customers, finds the next load assignments, and more. The job of a dispatcher is fast-paced and constantly changing.

If you are thinking about becoming a trucking dispatcher, you’ll want to know whether it’s a right fit for you. You don’t need formal education to become a dispatcher, however there are programs and classes that are very helpful to the position. The other approach is quite simple. Hands on experience.

Once you are a in the position, you will quickly learn that it can be occasionally stressful. To overcome this, check your documents and work before moving forward, because one mistake could cause a domino effect of many more mistakes.

Dispatchers are good at multitasking. From finishing a phone call, you’ll likely have multiple emails, then be back on the phone again, then try to manage more emails and phone calls. With that being said, it’s important to plan ahead—know what the weather will be like the next day, whether there’s construction on your route or not, and map out a general plan.

As a dispatcher you will work closely with drivers where you will have to communicate with clearly and regularly.

Go to Jobs Canada to find dispatcher jobs now.


 

SmartWay Technologies Reduce Emissions Significantly

- by Christina Hryniuk

Over the past decade, technology has dramatically improved supply chain freight efficiency. The SmartWay Technology Program have accredited numerous innovative technologies, which fleets are adopting because of the return on investment.

EPA-verified technologies reduce emissions for tractors, trailers, and locomotives. It also saves fuel. EPA varies aerodynamic devices, idling reduction equipment, and retread low rolling resistance tires. It also designates trailers quipped with combinations of EPA-verified technologies as SmartWay Trailers.

Fleet managers can buy SmartWay Verified Technologies directly from manufacturers and dealers.


Aerodynamic Devices for Trailers

Adding aerodynamic devices to smooth airflow over a truck on the highway is relatively cheap and an easy way for fleets to improve fuel economy in long-haul tractor-trailer applications.

Low Rolling Resistance (LRR) New and Retread Tire Technologies for tractors and trailers

Using the right tires cuts down on furl costs and harmful NOx emissions. Certain low rolling resistance tires and retread technologies can reduce cost and emissions for long-haul class 8 tractor-trailers by three percent or more.

To reach that reduction, the following requirements must be met:

Tires

  • Tires are used on the axle positions for which verification is specified.
  • Verified low rolling resistance tires are installed on all axle positions of the tractor and trailer. (Note: EPA has also demonstrated incremental fuel savings when low rolling resistance tires are used just on the tractor and/or just on the trailer.)
  • All tires are properly inflated according to the manufacturer's specifications.

Retreads

  • Verified retread technologies are used on both the drive and trailer axles. (Note: EPA has also demonstrated incremental fuel savings when low rolling resistance tires are used just on the tractor and/or just on the trailer.)
  • The retread technologies are used on the axle positions for which verification is specified.
  • Verified low rolling resistance steer tires are used.
  • All tires are properly inflated according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

Idling Reduction Technologies (IRTs) for trucks and school buses

In extreme weather conditions, truck divers must idle, but idling reduction technologies allow operators to shut down the main propulsion engine by using a device.

Each year, long-duration truck idling results in the following estimated figures:

  • 1 billion gallons of fuel consumption
  • 11 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2)
  • 180,000 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx)
  • 5,000 tons of particulate matter (PM)

Looking to save money and reduce your carbon footprint? Join SmartWay.

The Manitoba Trucking Association encourages all trucking companies to better educate themselves with the myriad of benefits the SmartWay program provides. SmartWay will be hosting a free webinar on Feb. 26 at 10 a.m.

Greening Freight Programs invites you to join this Webex meeting.

Meeting number (access code): 557 426 888
Meeting password: 8bBywY62
Wednesday, February 26, 2020
10:00 am | (UTC-06:00) Central Time (US & Canada) | 1 hr

Join Meeting


 

Manitoba Truckers Needed: How to Get Funding for Truck Driver Training

- by Christina Hryniuk

Manitoba’s most recent labour market information report (Labour Market Occupational Forecasts 2019-2025) shows transport truck driver is an occupation with one of the highest levels of net openings. In fact, 99 percent of the 500 specifically listed occupations in the report have lower new job numbers than transport truck driver.


Manitoba needs 4,100 Transport Truck Drivers by 2025 if the needs of the provincial economy are going to be met. While this information highlights a serious economic concern, it also presents significant job fulfillment and public policy opportunity. Specifically, in support of the Manitoba Skills Strategy and Manitoba Works plans which have targeted “enhanced alignment between workforce training …and labour market needs” as well as “40,000 private sector jobs”. According to a national labour market forecast, vacancies for truck drivers across the country have more than doubled since 2016 with 22,000 vacant positions in 2018.



So what options are available for carriers to fill these positions? There is the driver training funding program, which covers the cost of driver training for those eligible applicants. Hundreds of Manitobans have been trained via this program already. The Manitoba Trucking Association (MTA) encourages trucking companies looking for drivers to take part in the program.
So how does it work?


Funding for Truck Driver Training

People who are looking to become drivers first need to obtain their class 5 driver’s license and finish the graduated licensee process. At this point, air brakes certification may be required.


Once you complete the graduate process, you will need your class medical, which has to be completed by a doctor and can be obtained through the registry of motor vehicles or Manitoba Public Insurance (MPI) or your local insurance broker. Your medical conditions will be reviewed by a board of approval of Class 1 upgrade.



After you receive your medical, obtain the Class 1 instruction, book your test with MPI, and write your class 1 knowledge test.



You will then have to obtain your commercial abstract from MPI or your insurance broker. A commercial driver’s abstract reflects your driving habits for all class vehicles. The next step is to get a criminal record check. A clean search report is best because it allows you to cross the border, but its not necessary.



There are six approved truck driver training schools in the province. Upon registration the school will provide you with a letter acknowledging your registration.


You will also need to obtain a letter of intent from a trucking company. A letter is an acknowledgment-not an offer-that you spoke with them about the trucking industry. It indicates that the employer will hire you upon completing school and a company road test, based on the information you provided them. The letter of intent and registration letter will now allow you to approach your local Manitoba Jobs and Skills Development Centre for approval of funding.


Funding is available for the 240-hour Class 1 Training Program and is open to Canadian citizens and permanent residents.




For Employers

There are also opportunities to promote your organization by other means, such as Yes! Winnipeg’s 2020 International Recruitment Mission. The Asper School of Business regularly looks for companies to work with on co-op placements, as does Red River College. While these are not all opportunities for driving positions, the reality is that we need talented people throughout our industry.


Finally, there are resources available to smaller trucking companies, such as the Canada Small Business Financing Program, that will support investment in your organization (not specifically people) that may help your business grow as needed.


It can sometimes be a challenge to know where to turn to support your business, but the first place to try is the MTA. We regularly receive new information about new programs and opportunities, and we are always working to improve efficiency in bringing new people to our industry. So, if you have a question or aren’t sure where to turn for resources, contact us.


 

MTA's Executive Director Terry Shaw on CJOB talking about Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel

- by Christina Hryniuk

Terry Shaw, Executive Director of the Manitoba Trucking Association (MTA), speaks about the differences of biodiseal and renewable diesel in light of the province's announcement about increasing Manitoba's biodiesel content and what it means for the trucking industry. Shaw also dives in to other options for reducing green house gases.

The MTA has been advocating for the GrEEner Trucking Program for years. We will continue to advocate for other options such as electrification and policy programs that are industry standard.

Listen to the interview here.


 

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